These Signals Are Telling You Mania Is Here In Bipolar Disorder

By O'Connor Professional Group

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There are two types of bipolar disorder, bipolar I and bipolar II. Both are characterized by fluctuating moods which can range from moderate mood swings to such severe mood swings a person can seem like they are split in two. Bipolar I and Bipolar II vary in their demonstrations of mania. Bipolar II is more well known for hypomania, or a subtle version of mania. Bipolar I disorder, on the other hand, will include very developed episodes of mania which can last for weeks or months. Mania is an extended period of time which includes high levels of energy, excitement and confidence- at best. At worst, mania can include delusions, often of grandeur, risky behavior, substance abuse, and hyperactivity. People living with bipolar disorder have reported feeling like they lose track of time or black out when they are in a manic state. Since bipolar disorder also includes depression, mania is heightened by a feeling of escape, having made it out of a depressive episode. Part of the issue with recognizing manic behavior is being too far into a manic state to recognize the difference between the delusion of normalcy and the reality of mania.

These are some of the symptoms common to mania. If you notice these symptoms arising and you are aware of your bipolar disorder, or a bipolar diagnosis in someone else, it is important to monitor these symptoms. If behavior becomes exceedingly erratic and causes harm or a threat, a treatment intervention is needed. Contact the O’Connor Professional Group for a treatment consultation, plan management, and much more.

Slurred speech:

Slurred speech isn’t exclusive to intoxication on drugs or alcohol. In mania, the brain is moving at hyperspeed, sometimes too fast for motor functions to catch up with. It isn’t uncommon for people who are experiencing mania to have slurred speech, jumbled speech, or irregular speech. Their brain is moving too fast for the rest of their body to catch up. Messy handwriting and erratic, hyper movements are common as well.

Brilliant ideas:

Mania is most well known for its delusions of grandeur, which is most often illustrated through a series of “brilliant” ideas. Some of the greatest and most creative minds in the world are also minds that have bipolar disorder. For the majority, however, mania is a brief period full of exciting initiatives but zero follow through.

Insomnia:

Being so full of energy, excitement, and big plans can keep a person up at night. Insomnia is common in mania, which can lead to exhaustion and fatigue masked by ongoing energy.

Hypersexuality:

Sexual impulsivity and promiscuity can be common during manic episodes. Too much energy, a high state of confidence and self-esteem, and an obsessive mind can result in hypersexuality. The impulsivity and risk taking behaviors associated with manic episodes can result in promiscuity.

Obsessive thinking:

When the mind is moving too fast to keep up with itself, it can find a central focus to put all of its energy into. People, places, things, ideas, conspiracies, scenarios, and a number of other things can become the hyperfocus of someone in a manic state.

Impulsive spending:

The manic mind is operating on a high level of confidence, delusional thinking, and a lack of consequences. Commonly, this manifests in impulsive spending sprees.

Watching a loved one struggle with bipolar disorder can leave you feeling helpless. O’Connor Professional Group is here to offer you and your loved one the help you need to find healing and recovery through customized care plans, concierge style services, and more. For information, call us today: (617) 910-3940

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